London mourns the passing of Queen Elizabeth II: A photojournalist’s perspective

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
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A moment in time.

The passing of a queen, the only monarch many have ever known.

The United Kingdom mourns the passing of Queen Elizabeth II with reverence, sadness and of course, British pageantry.

Marcus Yam is on the ground in London to bring a visual perspective as England says goodbye to the queen.

Windsor

The hearse arrives covered in flowers thrown by onlookers. A woman holds back her tears.

The gloomy sky reflected on its large windows. Procession turns right onto the Long Walk towards Windsor

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

The Queen has arrived home.

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A man watches a procession bearing the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, slowly making its way towards the road leading to Windsor Castle.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
A funeral procession bearing the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II slowly makes its way towards the road leading to Windsor Castle.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Green Park

The last sunset before QueenElizabeth II’s funeral.

Evening glow brings warmth.

Members of the public pay their final respects to the late Queen Elizabeth II by placing flowers and other tributes in the memorial designated areas in Green Park.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
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Thousands gather at Green Park to offer their final tributes. To pay their respects.

A maze of memorials. A trove of personal notes. A floral farewell.

A young girl carry’s flowers and a stuffed animal as members of the public pay their final respects to the late Queen Elizabeth II in Green Park on the eve of her funeral in London.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Inside Westminster Hall

Enter the chamber. A solemn farewell.

After hours waiting in line, they pay their respect to Queen Elizabeth II as her coffin lies-in-state inside Westminster Hall.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

A nod, a salute, a bow or praying hands. The slow walk out.

A glance backwards. Then into the cold dark night.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
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Security is tight around Westminster Hall.

There are some who are not waiting in line to pay respects to #QueenElizabethII lying-in-state.

Police keep the peace and help direct foot traffic as the public gathers outside Westminster as others wait in line to view the Queen Elizabeth II lying-in-state at Westminster Hall.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

A couple with their arms locked together stroll away from the crowds outside Westminster Hall.

Their smiles bring warmth, even as the sun shines and the cold breeze blows behind them.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Along the River Thames

A bevy of swans float along the River Thames alongside members of the public waiting in queue to make their way towards Westminster Hall to view Queen Elizabeth II lying-in-state.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
Members of the public wait in queue and make their way along the Thames River to view Queen Elizabeth II lying-in-state at Westminster Hall.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

David Cookson checks on his sleeping daughter Clementine while in queue along the Thames River.

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He shushes calmly for her to go back to sleep.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Others pace, drink coffee, eat pizza, joke around, for at least 5 hours to view Queen Elizabeth II lying-in-state at Westminster Hall.

Many parents speak of the importance of involving their children in this British history.

Members of the public use their mobile phones to make a picture and catch glimpse of the procession for the hearse bearing Queen Elizabeth II passing them and making its way to Westminster Hall in London.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Many note the importance of the longest reigning Queen.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
To pass the time, hair is braided as members of the public pass the time camping out along the route where they will catch a glimpse of the procession for the hearse bearing Queen Elizabeth II.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

“She was a great queen, she was important as a woman. As a feminist it’s good for the boys to see that as young men.”

— Annabel Haken

Annabel Haken, and her son, Thomas, 4, sit along the procession route. Haken said that she brought her three boys to experience how the nation is grieving. She wanted them to understand “how important the royal family is to the British people.”
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
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They mourn, memorialize and respect.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Few express indifference about monarchs. But the legacy is history.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Buckingham Palace

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
Palace guards march in formation after the arrival of Queen Elizabeth II’s hearse at Buckingham Palace.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Rain pours but does not deter.

Hair pushed aside, faces glimmer wet. Someone yelled, “Long love the queen!”

A woman looks on after Queen Elizabeth II’s hearse arrives Tuesday at Buckingham Palace.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Camera flash sparkles the scene. Proper applause

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Chloe Charlton, 8, and her mother, Rachael, traveled from York to observe the funeral events for Queen Elizabeth II.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

A hearse bearing the late Queen Elizabeth II arrives.

Everyone looks.

A growing memorial for Queen Elizabeth II at Green Park in London.
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)